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Old 02-25-2017, 02:57 AM - Thread Starter
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6'X10' Fiber Optic Star Ceiling with 1&1/2" foam boards

10 years ago when I built my house, the future home theater was the first room I framed in. A few things we knew right away. First is that it would be a long time until we were able to build the home theater. Second was that we wanted a big screen, and third was that we wanted a star ceiling of some sort in there. Luckily I've been blessed with a brother who is an award winning contractor and a couple of friends that are really good at DIY type stuff like classic cars, custom building and pretty much anything in between.

I went back and forth on the ceiling with Jon and Jeremy several times, initially thinking I wanted to do a sunroof style with two panels over both rows of seats, but in the end and through all the discussion, I decided one large panel over both rows would work better. After calculating where the ceiling ATMOS speakers were going to go, and determining how everything lined up with the floor joists and the drop ceiling, I settled on a 74" wide by 120" long panel. The drop ceiling was framed with 2X6 boards specifically for the star ceiling. I installed R30 insulation and drywall inside the floor joists to provide some sound isolation from the basement. The next floor up has 3/4" plywood and 1&1/2" gypcrete above that, and the jury is still out if that is enough sound isolation or not.

Here is the initial framing of the drop ceiling. We installed a radius curve on the screen side, and the ATMOS speakers sit just to the side of where the star ceiling will be. I installed a center set of ATMOS speakers for 6 total if that technology someday becomes more common and affordable, but for now they will be sheetrocked over and stored in my memory for a hopeful future release:


I initially started the star ceiling with 3/4" MDF panels. I was hoping to do 1/2", but that material was unavailable in my area. The 3/4" MDF sheets would have made it a heavy bugger, so I did some research and found a build where a guy used 2" foam insulation boards. His ceiling was 6' wide by 24' long, so he used 4X6 boards and had a seam every 4 feet. I wanted seamless, so we got the material and started brainstorming on how to make it work:


As mentioned before, I installed R30 insulation in the floor joists and ran internal runs of drywall. I installed 2X2's inside the floor joists for nailer strips. Cheap, and hopefully somewhat effective:


We elected to make a large frame for the foam to sit inside of. I wanted LED RGB lighting around the perimeter as well, so off to work we went in Jeremy's garage making channels in the 2X6 boards for both the foam and the LED strip light. The channel for the foam boards is 3/4" deep, and the channel for the LED strip light is 3/4" deep by 3/4" wide, and it was cut with a slight upward angle. There will be small crown molding off the bottom to help tame the light and keep it mostly around the perimeter of the finished ceiling:


All of the boards were cut and we were ready to put them together for a test fit:


Once together, it sure looked promising at this point:


I took everything apart, loaded it in the truck and hauled it home. I had my 11 year old daughter help me put it all back together in the house, and we got busy figuring out the rest of the details like, how many stars, what patterns, how to apply the fabric, how do we connect the 3 foam panels widthwise to keep them from showing seems and sagging? Still lots to be done, but the ceiling got put on hold for a little while as I continued with other parts of the theater that were taking priority at the time.

Jerry
Fairbanks, Alaska
DIY In Progress Home Theater Build: /forum/19-ded...tic-build.html
Star Ceiling Build: /forum/19-ded...am-boards.html

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Old 02-25-2017, 02:57 AM - Thread Starter
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As much as I needed to work on other parts of the theater, I was really having fun with the star ceiling so I worked a couple hours each night on it. The next big step was to get some constellation patterns and start figuring out how many stars, and what kit to get. I did some research on "stars per square foot" and settled on ~5-6 stars per square foot. With some online searching, I decided to purchase the Wiedemark 288, 3 size fiber optic star ceiling kit http://wiedamark.com/288ledstarceiling.aspx
For the LED strip light, I purchased this one off Amazon: https://amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1 At 32 feet, it was a perfect size for the panel. I ended up cutting off the last 12" and had 4" of overlap.

I actually had already purchased the LED lighting before making the channels in the 2X6 boards, so I was able to play with the angles some on a few test boards:


Now that I knew how many stars to work with, I pulled out the Opaque Projector and started putting in some printed out constellation patterns to see what lined up the best. The Big Dipper, North Star and Cassiopeia were my main focal points, so the majority of the 24 larger (1.5mm) diameter fiber optic strands would be used for those.

I built a jig to hold the projector horizontally to get the best alignment:




I marked the star locations with different color sharpies to identify which holes needed small, medium or large fiber optics fed through them. I marked the stars on the viewing side of the panel, so I needed to drill them out and mark them on the back side for feeding the cables through. Once it was all marked up, we figured it would be a good idea to test fit the star ceiling into the drop ceiling. Jon and Jeremy were over helping with a few other items, so we quickly tossed it up. It was a perfect fit, hardly needed screws to hold it in place.


I had already taken a couple items into consideration, such as where to mount the illuminator for the fiber optic strands and where to run the power for the LED light strip. I used 1&1/2" PVC pipe to run conduits back to the AV cabinet. You can see in the picture below, I got a little ambitious with cutting out the holes and put the conduit for the LED lighting on top, when it should have been on the bottom. I put some blocking in there to stiffen up the accidental hole:


It got a little cold outside, but when the temps dip like this, you gotta take a moment for the photo ops. I grabbed my little helper, we tossed on our swimsuits and headed to the nearest temperature sign to click a few pictures. Yes, this is in Fahrenheit:
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Jerry
Fairbanks, Alaska
DIY In Progress Home Theater Build: /forum/19-ded...tic-build.html
Star Ceiling Build: /forum/19-ded...am-boards.html

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Old 02-25-2017, 02:58 AM - Thread Starter
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As you can see from the picture below, the star ceiling will sit flush with the bottom of the sheetrock. We left 1&1/2" above the foam for clearance of the fiber optic strands. The extra 1/2" from the drywall gave a solid 2", plus a little more in some areas with the cavity in the floor joists. After running some of the fiber optics, 2" is more than enough space.


One item I neglected to mention earlier is that the projector will end up being mounted in the star ceiling. I needed to determine the depth and size for the blocking, and I had initially marked a few stars where the projector was going to sit, so those needed to get moved:




Here we are looking at some trim options for once the panel is permanently installed:


Once we had the projector mount centered, we were able to determine the size of the blocking to house a conduit for the HDMI cable, and have an outlet box included. You can see in the below photo there was a little sag in the 1&1/2" foam board, so we installed 1/2" plywood around the perimeter of the blocking that we can screw the foam board into if necessary. At this point we still hadn't attached boards to the back of the foam panels to lock them together yet.



Firming things up was the next order of business. I purchased 2 1"X6' plank boards to use to bolt the foam boards together. With the use of 3" bolts, large washers on the foam side and nuts with lock washers on the board side, we were able to secure the foam boards together. It pulled the seams together tight, although there was still a little bit showing. My dilemma was, risk sanding them smooth and have a rogue sander make mince meat of my foam board, or leave the very slight seam and hope that the fabric hides it. I elected to trust the fabric to hide the seam, we'll see if that pays off in the future.


Another item I didn't mention before was drilling the holes in the foam for the stars. I used the smallest drill bit I could find with 3" of length to drill the holes. The drill really wanted to wander when it touched the foam, so it took a steady hand, and I found that higher RPM of the drill resulted in less wandering of the bit before it began to sink it. Care needs to be taken not to press too hard and end up with divets in the foam. I drilled from the viewing side, so I really took care not to make any dents or imprints on this end of the foam. I had lightly tightened the plank boards onto the foam panels and was able to locate the holes needed for the fiber optics by the small imprint from drilling through the foam. Once I was done drilling all the holes, I removed the boards, and drilled larger holes to feed the fiber optics through:



I found a 75" wide polyester fabric at JoAnn's that looked like it would be perfect for this project. I purchased 12' for around 30 bucks if I recall correctly. Now that all the holes were drilled, it was time to apply the fabric to the foam boards. First main regret, I should have painted the 2X6 boards while the panel was apart, or at the very least before the fabric was applied. I made it work after the fact, but it would have been much easier, and cleaner, if I would have done so sooner. Not much of the 2X6 will be visible, but enough of it will that I wanted to make sure it was blackened out.

First order of business, tighten the bolts to recess them into the foam panel. We did a couple of tests on a scrap piece of foam using a forstener bit, but in the end we found it wasn't needed and we could just simply tighten the bolts and recess the washers and bolt heads into the foam. My brother is one handed at the moment due to a pinky injury that went from bad to worse. His pinky is currently attached to his chest for a skin graft, but he still has one good working hand, so I put his butt to work.




We thought about using a filler for the bolt heads, but decided to leave the holes blank and let the tension of the fabric do its magic. It was a chance, but it worked out well and we weren't able to see the 12 holes (6 per board). We laid the fabric down and disconnected two ends of the panel to separate the foam boards in order to wrap the fabric:


Here is our sticky stuff. One can worked out well to get the entire center of the fabric and the foam sprayed, but it did not leave any for the sides. By design, we had made this a very tight fit, so ultimately I don't feel we needed the adhesive on the sides, but it would have been a nice insurance, and may have helped hold the fabric better while we were trying to reassemble the entire panel:


I gave Jeremy the honors of applying the Super 77. He sprayed the fabric, then the foam and we waited a couple of minutes for it to get tacky to the touch. Once it was tacky, my brother, Jon, held up one end and my wife came down to hold up the other end. Jeremy and I worked the fabric from the center to the edge with our hands to apply it smooth onto the board. We kept a slow and steady pace, and it was really going on well. We had to keep very consistent or the fabric would start to wander to one side. This happened on the first half, and I believe it was due to either my wife or Jon pulling a little harder on the fabric. Luckily there was enough slack to keep enough of a flap to go completely into the channel for putting the panel back together. The second side went much smoother as we had a little experience from the first side. It only took a minute or so for the fabric to be set onto the foam, and it wasn't going to go anywhere.




We all put a quick signature on the top of the panel and put it up on the saw horses for me to start the final work:



Shortly after, I wrapped up sheetrocking the theater, and my mudder/painter was to begin the next day. He was going to be 10 days or so to finish up, so that was my timeline to work on the star ceiling and get it finished up:


Jerry
Fairbanks, Alaska
DIY In Progress Home Theater Build: /forum/19-ded...tic-build.html
Star Ceiling Build: /forum/19-ded...am-boards.html

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Old 02-25-2017, 02:58 AM - Thread Starter
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So this is reserved for completion, but I'll update as I progress until the job is done. I put on two coats of black paint, only getting a little on the polyester, but it wiped up well, leaving only a very slight marking.

I installed the LED light strip in the channel and it fit beautifully. I cut off the last 12" of the strip light, and had about 4" of overlap that is unnoticeable. I'm a little concerned with my decision to not smooth out the slight seam between the foam boards, but in all honesty, it is not very noticeable and the bright LED lights really seem to exaggerate it. It virtually disappears when the LED lights are off. Once the crown molding is installed, it should really tame the LED lights, but I'll have to see how it ends up with the fiber optic lights casting their hue.

As of this time, I have only used the adhesive backing from the light strip to apply it in the channel, but I do plan to tack a few spots with glue or silicone when I glue down the fiber optic cables.




On Friday night I started running some of the fiber optic cables. The cables did not want to poke through, so I had to cut them at an angle to make them spear through the fabric. If I poked two or three times and it didn't go through, I would recut the tip until it gave a sharp enough edge. By the time I got all the way through the first group of fibers, I only had to recut about 1 in 10.




I put a zip tie on the ends of the fiber optic strands to indicate how much I needed to leave to feed through the conduit and into the AV cabinet where the illuminator will sit. I purchased the kit with 20' long strands to make sure I had enough length. Once I had all the strands through, I purchased some 3/4" electrical clamps to hold the fiber optic runs onto the board. 5/8" or 1/2" would have been better as I was able to fit all 288 fibers into a 3/4" clamp. This is an important step, because even the slightest movement would make all of the fibers pull up anywhere from 1" to 4". Once the strands were secure, I applied Loctite Powergrab. I was originally thinking clear silicone, but the Loctite showed foamboard as a surface it would adhere to, so I elected to use it. Within minutes the strands were pretty secure, and the next morning the Loctite beads were like rocks and the strands aren't going anywhere. I used probably way more than I needed to, so I ran out of the 6oz bottle a little past half way done. I picked up another bottle today and I'll finish tonight.



The painter finished up on Friday and we installed the ceiling Saturday. We had a couple of difficulties getting the ceiling in its final resting place. After the addition of the fabric, it seemed to slightly widen the frame of the star ceiling, and it fit considerably tighter this time. It took quite a bit of hammering and force to get it flush with the bottom of the drywall, but we finally got it there. We had to feed the fiber optic cable runs down the conduit, which was fairly easy. The LED light strip on the other hand proved to be a big hurdle. We ended up having to widen the hole in the star ceiling to feed the adapter for the LED lights through, and in the process, we nicked the wires and ended up having to solder and connect them back together. Luckily everything went back together okay, and we were able to feed everything through, finish screwing in the ceiling and start the final touches. I clipped all of the strands down to nearly flush with the fabric, Jon installed the outlet and got the HDMI cable pulled through, and Jeremy worked on re-connecting the LED lights. We still have to put border trim around the base as well as the crown molding, but that part will have to wait. I am very happy with the end result.

We put a bead of Loctite around the 1/2" plywood to give the foam a little more support from possible sagging:


The ceiling is ready to be installed, finally!


My wife jumped in (literally) to the AV cabinet area to work the fiber optic strands and LED lighting through the conduit and into the cabinet:


After a lot of forced motivation, the star ceiling was finally flush with the finished ceiling:



Jon installed the outlet for the projector and pulled the HDMI cable through a small slit in the fabric:


I worked on cutting the fiber optic strands to nearly flush with the fabric. If too much was left, it was cast a lot more light around the fabric and take away from the "star" look.


It looked awesome when they were all trimmed, it really came to life:



The illuminator and the power supply for the LED lights were brought into the AV cabinet. I plan to make a slide in cabinet for the AV equipment, and in the top corner I will make a removable panel to be able to access these if needed. The star wheel on the illuminator makes more noise than I had expected, but I am hoping after finishing the cabinet, the noise will be contained inside the cabinet. Mounting it this way worked very well as the on/off switch and the adjustments for the twinkle wheel are both on the accessible end.


I will add finished photo's soon. All of the lights, including the LED's are working, but I didn't get pictures of those tonight.
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Jerry
Fairbanks, Alaska
DIY In Progress Home Theater Build: /forum/19-ded...tic-build.html
Star Ceiling Build: /forum/19-ded...am-boards.html

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Old 02-25-2017, 03:18 AM
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Fantastic that you are posting this. I just purchased 1" foam board with the lap edges. Going to paint mine black with Behr paint/ primer then wrap with speaker cloth. For sagging, I was going to use some tin drywall channel and stick across the back with PL adhesive. Might be an option for you.
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Old 02-25-2017, 04:23 AM - Thread Starter
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In hindsight, I may have tried using OC703 or Roxul Rockboards if I had known a little more about room acoustics before I got too far into this project.

We thought about using 1/2" aluminum angle to help with sagging, but the foam is pretty rigid already, and the 1"X6" boards really pulled it together well.
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Jerry
Fairbanks, Alaska
DIY In Progress Home Theater Build: /forum/19-ded...tic-build.html
Star Ceiling Build: /forum/19-ded...am-boards.html
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Old 02-25-2017, 07:00 AM
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Awesome post!

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Old 02-25-2017, 11:52 AM
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Jerry..,

Good work, I am planning to attempt one and currently researching on the acoustics side effects. I saw you posted about OC 703.
I have some 2" OC703 that i could use, but wondering if that much absorption on the ceiling and its effect. Can you shed some light( or sound.. on this, if you have already studies this.

Regards, NJ

Fronts: RF-82 II
Center: RC-62II
Subs: 2 X R-112SW
Front Surrounds: 2 X RS-52II
Rear Surrounds: 2 X RB-61 II
ATMOS in ceiling: 4 X Klipsch CDT-5800-C II
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Old 02-25-2017, 05:54 PM - Thread Starter
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I have a total of three months of home theater experience, and I've probably obtained about 75% of my knowledge from this website. I'm just now starting to learn about acoustics and trying to determine what my needs will be for my theater. I'm hoping somebody chimes in on your question as I'd like to know the answer to that, but I can't answer that question for you.

You may be right though, that much acoustic paneling over a large span might actually have some detrimental effects, but that would be for the pros to answer. I did ask on the acoustic thread about the 1&1/2" foam panels and the possibility of those having some benefit in regards to acoustics, but I only got one response and it was a no.

I am thinking of using the channel design to frame acoustic panels for the walls and ceiling. I'm looking to use 2X4's or 2X3's and making a channel on the wide edge about 3/4" deep to seat the rockboard or OC703 into them. I could wrap the fabric the same way I did with the star ceiling which gives it a very good finished look, especially if there are no seams.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nandkisham View Post
Jerry..,

Good work, I am planning to attempt one and currently researching on the acoustics side effects. I saw you posted about OC 703.
I have some 2" OC703 that i could use, but wondering if that much absorption on the ceiling and its effect. Can you shed some light( or sound.. on this, if you have already studies this.

Regards, NJ

Jerry
Fairbanks, Alaska
DIY In Progress Home Theater Build: /forum/19-ded...tic-build.html
Star Ceiling Build: /forum/19-ded...am-boards.html
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Old 02-28-2017, 05:47 PM - Thread Starter
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Here is a resource that was handy in helping decide how many stars to purchase for your star ceiling. I wanted enough to make it full, but not over do it.



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Jerry
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Old 02-28-2017, 07:58 PM
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Great write-up! I may have to rethink the size I was planning on though, ~9' x 18' might be more than I want to tackle.
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Old 02-28-2017, 10:32 PM - Thread Starter
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9' X 18' is a huge area! I could picture 4, 4X8 panels with a finished or painted wood blocking in between that would give you a finished 8.5X16.5 with a nice finished trim around the border and throughout the center. I think that would look sharp. Working off of 4X8 sheets really wouldn't be that bad. It would be time consuming, but in the end well worth it!

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Great write-up! I may have to rethink the size I was planning on though, ~9' x 18' might be more than I want to tackle.
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Old 03-01-2017, 08:37 AM
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It might just be too labor intensive. I may have missed it in your posts but how long did it take to install your ~288 fibers?
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Old 03-01-2017, 10:43 AM - Thread Starter
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Once I figured out the cuts on the ends of the fibers to get them to poke through the fabric, it went much faster. I figured it was probably a few hours total to get them all through. I actually enjoyed that part.
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Old 03-05-2017, 12:28 AM - Thread Starter
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Got the star ceiling installed today. I updated post #4 with several pictures and descriptions. I'm very happy with the end result, but I still have some trim work left to be done. The first couple of pictures show a wire hanging down. That is for one of the ATMOS speakers.






The illuminator and power for the lighting will go inside of the AV cabinet and be mounted to the wall. One of the easier parts of the install, if it weren't for the LED connectors separating as we were installing the ceiling.
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Jerry
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DIY In Progress Home Theater Build: /forum/19-ded...tic-build.html
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Old 03-05-2017, 10:42 AM
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So these kits are a LOT cheaper than I thought they cost. I plan on pursuing this now - is rigid foam the standard, or what is normally used for the floating ceiling material?
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Old 03-05-2017, 10:55 AM - Thread Starter
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It seemed like MDF was the more common material for these ceilings, but we determined that it would have been too heavy to handle, and with the span, would have had a possibility of sagging without a bunch of bracing, so I elected to try out the 1&1/2" foam board. In all my searching, I only found one other resource that showed foam board being used, and it was with 2" boards. They used 4X6 panels and had seams every 4 feet. This would have been a lot easier, but since I wanted seamless, I did mine this way. I'm very satisfied with it, but there is a little room for improvement. I can only see a slight line where the seams are when the room lights are on and the ceiling lights are off. When it is lit up, the slight lines are not noticeable.

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Old 03-05-2017, 08:48 PM
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Maybe hard board so as to not take up too much thickness? The benefit of that foam is that it is so light it will stay rigid without the need for bracing.

I just bought some premium black velvet and I'm thinking of using that as the fabric. I'd mark my stars on the back, attach the velvet, then maybe just hammer nails through the holes and poke through the fabric in one shot.
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Old 03-05-2017, 09:37 PM - Thread Starter
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I'd be worried about making too large of holes in the fabric by doing that. I was looking for a velvet material to use, but I couldn't find one with a >72" width, so I went with the polyester. If you aren't following constellation patterns, it would be a lot easier as you could just point and shoot with the fiber optic strands. I'd mark them first to make sure you have a consistent spread of stars.

I also tried nails through the foam, and it was much easier to use a drill bit. The foam would start to compress around the foam and make it much harder to press them through. I was concerned I would blow out a chunk of foam on the far side if I kept pushing it.

Jerry
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Old 03-06-2017, 08:47 AM
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Great thread! For anyone looking for a smaller scale project, this is what we did - it was a nice project the whole family could be involved in.

I followed the instructions at Star Ceilings 123 (and bought the 288 strand illuminator kit from them) and built a 40"x80" panel using a 1" foam board. We stretched velvet (Royalty 3 from Joann) and stapled with a pneumatic stapler to the wood framing on the back. I then created a scaled grid on a piece of legal/A4 size paper and had the kids make the pattern following the ~4 stars per sqft rule and then transferred that to the back of the foam (I drew a grid on the back). To insert the fibers, I just used a thick sewing/darning needle to popke through the foam and velvet, pulled it out and pushed the fiber through. Sometimes we had to spread index and middle finger around where the needle was going to come out (you can see it pushing on the velvet) to hold it tight so it could come through, but it was all pretty easy and fast. After all were done, I then added a drop of Elmer's school glue in the hole on the back of the foam side to keep each fiber in place.
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Old 05-30-2017, 02:53 PM
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Great thread! For anyone looking for a smaller scale project, this is what we did - it was a nice project the whole family could be involved in.

I followed the instructions at Star Ceilings 123 (and bought the 288 strand illuminator kit from them) and built a 40"x80" panel using a 1" foam board. We stretched velvet (Royalty 3 from Joann) and stapled with a pneumatic stapler to the wood framing on the back. I then created a scaled grid on a piece of legal/A4 size paper and had the kids make the pattern following the ~4 stars per sqft rule and then transferred that to the back of the foam (I drew a grid on the back). To insert the fibers, I just used a thick sewing/darning needle to popke through the foam and velvet, pulled it out and pushed the fiber through. Sometimes we had to spread index and middle finger around where the needle was going to come out (you can see it pushing on the velvet) to hold it tight so it could come through, but it was all pretty easy and fast. After all were done, I then added a drop of Elmer's school glue in the hole on the back of the foam side to keep each fiber in place.
Great job! It looks great.

I am planning on doing something similar in my theater. One question I had is how far can the ends (the stars) be from the illuminator? For example, if we use 30' fiber optics in some part of the ceiling and 12' fiber optics in others, will the 12' fiber optics look much brighter?
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Old 05-30-2017, 03:02 PM - Thread Starter
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Great job! It looks great.

I am planning on doing something similar in my theater. One question I had is how far can the ends (the stars) be from the illuminator? For example, if we use 30' fiber optics in some part of the ceiling and 12' fiber optics in others, will the 12' fiber optics look much brighter?

I measured the furthest strand and bought the kit accordingly. My longest run was going to be around 17-18', so I ordered the entire kit with 20' strands. The stars that are closer to the illuminator seem the same brightness as the stars that are furthest away. I don't think the fiber length makes any noticeable difference in brightness with these shorter runs.

Jerry
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Old 05-30-2017, 06:41 PM
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Would it be too much acoustic treatment if I used 1" OC 703 or Roxul 60 on the entire ceiling and about 60% of the walls?

Also, what is the best way to put these treatments up against drywall? Nails? Pins? etc. Do you think there would be an issue with the fiber optics getting crushed if the treatments were going directly against the drywall?
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Old 05-30-2017, 06:42 PM
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Great job! It looks great.

I am planning on doing something similar in my theater. One question I had is how far can the ends (the stars) be from the illuminator? For example, if we use 30' fiber optics in some part of the ceiling and 12' fiber optics in others, will the 12' fiber optics look much brighter?
It takes extremely long runs before optic fiber cable light loss becomes noticeable to the human eye. We're talking kilometers. You will see no difference over the distances we use in our theaters.
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Old 05-31-2017, 09:59 AM - Thread Starter
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Would it be too much acoustic treatment if I used 1" OC 703 or Roxul 60 on the entire ceiling and about 60% of the walls?

Also, what is the best way to put these treatments up against drywall? Nails? Pins? etc. Do you think there would be an issue with the fiber optics getting crushed if the treatments were going directly against the drywall?
I couldn't say for sure on the acoustic treatment. I'd imagine doing the whole ceiling would be too much, but I'm in the learning stages as well so hopefully somebody with more experience will chime in.


As for the spacing, you will need to allow spacing for the fibers. I'd think about an inch would be the bare minimum. I read some other threads where people had strands break, but I didn't have any issues, and some of my bends were pretty severe. Having a space between the OC boards and the drywall could actually help improve their effectiveness with sound absorption.

Jerry
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Old 05-31-2017, 10:15 AM
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Great job! It looks great.

I am planning on doing something similar in my theater. One question I had is how far can the ends (the stars) be from the illuminator? For example, if we use 30' fiber optics in some part of the ceiling and 12' fiber optics in others, will the 12' fiber optics look much brighter?
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It takes extremely long runs before optic fiber cable light loss becomes noticeable to the human eye. We're talking kilometers. You will see no difference over the distances we use in our theaters.
The only issue I've had is that the wider strands are too bright compared to the thinner, but I've been cutting up some Light Dims film to place over the larger strands at the bundle/emitter end. Still a little trimming needed to get it right, but it's much better than without.
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Old 05-31-2017, 10:58 AM
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Would it be too much acoustic treatment if I used 1" OC 703 or Roxul 60 on the entire ceiling and about 60% of the walls?



Also, what is the best way to put these treatments up against drywall? Nails? Pins? etc. Do you think there would be an issue with the fiber optics getting crushed if the treatments were going directly against the drywall?


I'd suggest at your first point of reflection only. That is one of the main reasons I'm going with fibre optic vs. paint.
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Old 05-31-2017, 12:03 PM
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I'd suggest at your first point of reflection only. That is one of the main reasons I'm going with fibre optic vs. paint.
Do you think it would work to use OC 703 panels at the first reflection and then use regular 2' x 4' x 1" foam for the non-first reflections? i.e. so that the whole home theater is paneled with fiber optic stars but only some of the panels are absorptive?

I also did some more research and it sounds like t-pins can hold up 1" OC 703 + fabric. I assume the fiber optic wouldn't add much weight to it so that t-pins could still be used to hold 1" OC 703 + fabric + fiber optic lighting.
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Old 05-31-2017, 01:57 PM
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Wow - can't believe I missed this thread. I am going to be doing the same thing in my basement VERY soon except I'll be using 1/2" MDF instead of foam board for my panels (due to height constraints). I have the illuminator and all of the fiber-optic cabling I'll need. The panels are cut (12 of them!) and all I have to do is decide on a layout. I'm thinking 50 stars per panel (each panel is about 40"x40").

This will be a big help!
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Old 06-01-2017, 05:58 PM
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Do you think it would work to use OC 703 panels at the first reflection and then use regular 2' x 4' x 1" foam for the non-first reflections? i.e. so that the whole home theater is paneled with fiber optic stars but only some of the panels are absorptive?



I also did some more research and it sounds like t-pins can hold up 1" OC 703 + fabric. I assume the fiber optic wouldn't add much weight to it so that t-pins could still be used to hold 1" OC 703 + fabric + fiber optic lighting.


That would depend on the foam being used - does it have absorption properties. Does the foam have reflective tape on one side?
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