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Old 06-16-2005, 10:03 AM - Thread Starter
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I have a couple of non 45 degree angles that I need to cut for my baseboards in my home theater. I can not use a protractor due to tight space. Is there a simple way to figure out what the angles should be for the cut ?
Thanks for any help !

Greg
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Old 06-16-2005, 10:57 AM
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Trial and error. Just take some of your scrap and adjust the cuts till it fits - then do your real pieces. Other than that, you could just measure from the breakout of the first piece to the wall, mark it, then measure from there to the other wall and do the trig to get the angle. Obviously you'd want to measure with something like calipers as a tape would be way to coarse.

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Old 06-16-2005, 11:06 AM
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As bpape said, use a couple of scrap pieces until you get the angle right. My room has several odd angles, and that's what worked well for me.

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Old 06-16-2005, 12:47 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks guys I'll try that!!!!
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Old 06-16-2005, 02:37 PM
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If I can explain this and make it understandable:

Use a short scrap of wood, with a 90 degree angle and butt it up into the corner. Take another identical piece and butt it up into the same corner, from the opposite direction, and setting on top of the first piece. Use a pencil and draw a line on the lower piece, using the end of the upper piece as a guide. Use this pencil line to set the angle on your saw. This will work for any angle, either inside, or outside.
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Old 06-16-2005, 03:04 PM
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Cut the angle into a piece of paper. When the paper fits perfect, fold it in half and there is your angle. Or you can measure the paper with the protractor.

There are no stupid questions, but there are a LOT of inquisitive idiots. Me being one of them at times.

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Old 06-17-2005, 11:43 AM
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I second the paper trick. In fact, just fold a piece to match the profile and then fold in half. Lay that on your miter saw and adust the blade to the paper. You can leave the protractor in the toolbox.

Bobby

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Old 06-17-2005, 12:17 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks again to all, Now I don't have to go to Home Depot and buy a protractor. The paper trick will keep me from having alot of cuts on the miter saw trying to get the angle right.

Greg
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Old 06-17-2005, 12:28 PM
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It's even easier with two pieces of card stock of equal width. Put a strip against each wall. Mark the points where the inside edges and outside edges overlap. Connect the points with a pencil line. Cut on the lines with a scissors and you have a template for each cut to take to the miter saw. Avoid measuring when you can mark a template or the stock instead. Also think about coping inside corners.

Pat

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Old 06-17-2005, 12:53 PM
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Damn. I wish I had all those fancy paper and cardboard tools ;)

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Old 06-17-2005, 05:17 PM
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A trick that was recently outlined in Fine Homebuilding is to take scrap of flat stock and create test pieces. Miter a pair at 44, 45 & 46 degrees and mark them as such to avoid them from getting mixed up as well as to determine where to set the saw.

Try this method for tight, professional looking joints on your baseboard, chair rail, or crown installs. The same thing applies to all of them.

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Old 07-17-2005, 07:54 AM
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My wife and I are getting ready to do a chair rail project (pure novices). We own very few power tools. I searched a few threads, and think I have the basics covered. Sounds like people favor using a miter saw for this type of trim work. Is a miter saw something we'll have lots of uses for in the future? My gut says yes, as the trim work in the HT is more likely to be done by me than anything else - but I guess we could decide to rent a miter saw for the project and/or look to get the chair rails pre-cut.

If we buy, any product recomendations?
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Old 07-17-2005, 08:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dc_pilgrim
My wife and I are getting ready to do a chair rail project (pure novices). We own very few power tools. I searched a few threads, and think I have the basics covered. Sounds like people favor using a miter saw for this type of trim work. Is a miter saw something we'll have lots of uses for in the future? My gut says yes, as the trim work in the HT is more likely to be done by me than anything else - but I guess we could decide to rent a miter saw for the project and/or look to get the chair rails pre-cut.

If we buy, any product recomendations?
I don't have any reccomendations on brand, but if you even plan on doing base trim that is wider than 5", I reccomend getting a 12" or sliding mitre saw. I borrowed a friends 10" saw for my chair rail and base, and the 10" was too small to make the angeled cuts on the base trim.

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Old 07-17-2005, 08:46 AM
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I second the coping suggestion. No inside corners are ever truly 90 degrees and no two are ever just alike. Coping takes all of this out of play as you can do them all exactly the same and the corners are perfectly tight. This is especially important on stained trim - with paint you can use caulk and get away with a much less precise fit.
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Old 07-17-2005, 08:48 AM
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Just to mention, there is a simple little tool you can get at HD or Lowes. It's made to measure inside and outside angles just for this very work. I can't remember what it is called but it is plastic and not too expensive. It's definitely easier then any of the cardboard methods.

Now I also many times have used the "cut out various angles" method where I just take the precut pieces and see which is closest. Generally, due to mudding the corners, I find that exterior corners are usually between 45-46 degree cuts, while inner corners are 43 to 45 degree cuts.
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